Performance Poetries / Ethnography / Pedagogy

So I jacked this one up a bit. Koyczan’s band isn’t “Short Story Small”; it’s “Short Story Long.” Ima blame that faux pas on the mental fog of having a cold…

polipoesia:

Audio annotation for Shane Koyczan: introspective word virtuoso—not so much in your face as make you think. Love this line from “Stop Signs”: “I wanna kiss you like a traffic jam.” And love “Beethoven.”

(Recorded—my head-cold-voice and ums and ahs included—using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I drove home after dropping the four year old at preschool. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Source: polipoesia

Performance studies aspires to be “radically democratic and counterelitist.” How then can I put this into practice as an emerging performance studies teacher-scholar? How can I question “academic authority” while being embedded in the academy? And ultimately to what end?

(From Craig Gingrich-Philbrook, “The Queer Performance That Will Have Been: Student-Teachers in the Archive” in Teaching Performance Studies.)

Performance studies aspires to be “radically democratic and counterelitist.” How then can I put this into practice as an emerging performance studies teacher-scholar? How can I question “academic authority” while being embedded in the academy? And ultimately to what end?

(From Craig Gingrich-Philbrook, “The Queer Performance That Will Have Been: Student-Teachers in the Archive” in Teaching Performance Studies.)

Five articles on slam poetry, sound poetry, teaching poetry through performance, promoting non-violence through slam, and embodiment:

1. Julie Schmid, “Spreading the Word: A History of the Poetry Slam,” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 23-26 (2001-2002): 636-45: Briefly (oh, so briefly) traces the history of the poetry slam, highlighting major players, main movements, and the current state of the art (as of 2001).

2. Conrad DiDiodato, “Sound Poetry: Penn Kemp and the Metamorphosed Ear,” Ascent Aspirations Magazine (2010): Explores how poet-shaman, sonosopher, and medium of transformation Penn Kemp turns the textual/oral binary on its head, favoring and savoring a performative return in her sound poems to a pre-literate, “Neolithic” aurality.

3. Steven Z. Athanases, “Performing the Drama of the Poem: Workshop, Rehearsal, and Reflection,” English Journal 95.1 (2005): 88-96: Reflects on a week-long, performance-centered poetry unit taught in a high school literature class and concludes that a performance approach to poetry study (as to literary study) favors engaging with poetry and not simply dissecting it for meaning.

4. Heather Bruce and Brian Davis, “Slam: Hip-hop Meets Poetry: A Strategy for Violence Prevention,” English Journal 89.5 (2000): 119-27: Central principle: language carefully considered, crafted, and powerfully shared/performed can change others for good and reduce violence. By encouraging students to engage with poetries, to expand their views of what poetry/language/literacy are, teachers can provide them with channels through which to wisely direct their emotions.

5. John T. Warren, “The Body Politic: Performance, Pedagogy, and the Power of Enfleshment,” Text & Performance Quarterly 19.3 (1999): 257-66: Central concern: with the creation of a performative pedagogy that engages performance as pedagogical practice. Warren proposes this in response to a line of scholarship that uses performance as a metaphor for what happens in a classroom in the interactions among teachers, students and their bodies—bodies that are culturally, socially, historically, ideologically embedded in a particular time and space and that depend on these things for the creation, performance, and perpetuation of personal and group identity.

Five articles on slam poetry, sound poetry, teaching poetry through performance, promoting non-violence through slam, and embodiment:

1. Julie Schmid, “Spreading the Word: A History of the Poetry Slam,” Talisman: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry and Poetics 23-26 (2001-2002): 636-45: Briefly (oh, so briefly) traces the history of the poetry slam, highlighting major players, main movements, and the current state of the art (as of 2001).

2. Conrad DiDiodato, “Sound Poetry: Penn Kemp and the Metamorphosed Ear,” Ascent Aspirations Magazine (2010): Explores how poet-shaman, sonosopher, and medium of transformation Penn Kemp turns the textual/oral binary on its head, favoring and savoring a performative return in her sound poems to a pre-literate, “Neolithic” aurality.

3. Steven Z. Athanases, “Performing the Drama of the Poem: Workshop, Rehearsal, and Reflection,” English Journal 95.1 (2005): 88-96: Reflects on a week-long, performance-centered poetry unit taught in a high school literature class and concludes that a performance approach to poetry study (as to literary study) favors engaging with poetry and not simply dissecting it for meaning.

4. Heather Bruce and Brian Davis, “Slam: Hip-hop Meets Poetry: A Strategy for Violence Prevention,” English Journal 89.5 (2000): 119-27: Central principle: language carefully considered, crafted, and powerfully shared/performed can change others for good and reduce violence. By encouraging students to engage with poetries, to expand their views of what poetry/language/literacy are, teachers can provide them with channels through which to wisely direct their emotions.

5. John T. Warren, “The Body Politic: Performance, Pedagogy, and the Power of Enfleshment,” Text & Performance Quarterly 19.3 (1999): 257-66: Central concern: with the creation of a performative pedagogy that engages performance as pedagogical practice. Warren proposes this in response to a line of scholarship that uses performance as a metaphor for what happens in a classroom in the interactions among teachers, students and their bodies—bodies that are culturally, socially, historically, ideologically embedded in a particular time and space and that depend on these things for the creation, performance, and perpetuation of personal and group identity.

Source: Flickr / carbonnyc

Audio annotation for Shane Koyczan: introspective word virtuoso—not so much in your face as make you think. Love this line from "Stop Signs": “I wanna kiss you like a traffic jam.” And love “Beethoven.”

(Recorded—my head-cold-voice and ums and ahs included—using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I drove home after dropping the four year old at preschool. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Audio annotation for Tracie Morris: hip-hop-sound-academic-performance poet extraordinaire. Not only does Morris’ performance register and style defamiliarize language and textual experience, as I mention here, but she can also defamiliarize bodily experience, too (as here).

(Recorded—my head-cold-voice and ums and ahs included—using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I drove to pick up the five year old from kindergarten. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Source: youtube.com

Audio annotation for John Trudell: poet-prophet-activist. My head-cold-voice and ums and ahs included.

(Recorded using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I sat in the car waiting to pick up the five year old from kindergarten. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Source: youtube.com

Notes on textsound: an online audio publication, Issue 9 (2010), edited by Jon Cotner and Andy Fitch.

1. Cotner & Fitch: introducing the special issue, this C & F collaboration, explaining a bit about each piece. Recorded as they travel in a cab (?) through NY
2. Cotner: talking to a cat
3. Cotner: narrating a jog through the park (these are reminiscent of David Antin talk poems)
4. Cotner & Fitch: a conversation about stolen food, how one of them stole food, saw a former student, etc. LONG! Follows meandering of conversation
5. Cotner & Fitch: conversation about Fitch’s haircut as it’s being cut
6. Cotner & Fitch: more about the haircut
7. More of Cotner & Fitch…
8. …performing…
9. …a relationship/friendship
10. The performativity…
11. …of everyday…
12. …life
13. Kind of weird
14. Excerpts from one of the speakers performing a journey to an island
15. Performing a journey to an island, a walk around an island, waterfalls, etc. (LONG LONG LONG!)

Overall: Like Issue 8, also a bit strange. The main things I take from this collaboration: the polyvocality—lots of voices here—and performativity of everyday life and experience…and some people can be so full of themselves. Also a question: can (must?) we label everything performative? Reminds me a bit (as mentioned above) of David Antin’s talk poems.

Source: textsound.org

Notes on textsound: an online audio publication, Issue 8 (2010), edited by Whit Pow.

1. Chen: long. Lots of cello work, some singing (chanting?)
2. Toscano: loop of the artist’s vocals and beat-boxing
3. Touchon: computer-generated voice over patriotic music (horns, drums) (a march)
4. Thurman: synthesized sound effects, drums, etc.
5. Sanders: snippets of voice recordings, interspersed with generous helpings of silence
6. Martin: barbershop-esque chant 
7. Caracano: dissonant piano music plays in the background. Foreground: a speaker repeats/remixes a similar sentence, w/lots of “f***ing” involved
8. Kostelanetz & Chadabe: speakers’ voices are digitized, remixed (at beginning) with various sound effects. Also, speakers say words, which are then performed with sounds
9. Flood: synthesizer music—very new agey 
10. Kostelanetz [embedded above]: speaker arguing with himself: “No, I’m Richard Kostelanetz”—his voice modulated, remixed, lengthened, repeated, digitized, etc.
11. Toscano: track #2 redux, with more beat-boxing
12. Martin: layers of speaker’s voice, saying the same thing in rounds—takes on a rap-like cadence near the end.

Overall: I’m not gonna lie: this is all a bit strange. But I enjoyed a lot of it, especially the way many of these artists use different vocal tracks of themselves performing. These tracks create an interesting polyvocality that suggests, in part, the varieties of personal and cultural identity—the self brushing up against other performances of that self. Brings into question received notions of authenticity and performativity.

Source: textsound.org

Audio annotation for Verbal Art as Performance by Richard Bauman. Looking at verbal art (language in performance) in context. Beyond linguistics. Situated. Embedded. Framed.

(Recorded using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I sat in a garaged car after taking the three year old to preschool. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Audio annotation for Verbal Art as Performance by Richard Bauman. Looking at verbal art (language in performance) in context. Beyond linguistics. Situated. Embedded. Framed.

(Recorded using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I sat in a garaged car after taking the three year old to preschool. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Source: Flickr / nailest

Audio annotation for Jerome Rothenberg, ethnopoet, technician of the sacred.

(Recorded using the Memos app on my iPhone 4 as I sat in the garaged car after taking the three year old to preschool. m4a file translated to mp3 using iTunes. Uploaded and shared via Dropbox.)

Source: youtu.be